Review; Little Bookshop of Murder: A Beach Reads Mystery by Maggie Blackburn

Last year I was fortunate enough to recieve an ARC of the cosy mystery Little Bookshop of Murder: A Beach Reads Mystery by Maggie Blackburn through Netgalley. I read it shortly afterwards and today I'll post my review.

Description from Goodreads
A Shakespearean scholar inherits a beachside bookshop--and a murder mystery--in this delightful new cozy series for fans of Kate Carlisle and Ellery Adams.

Summer Merriweather's career as a Shakespeare professor hangs by a bookbinder's thread. Academic life at her Virginia university is a viper's pit, so Summer spends her summer in England, researching a scholarly paper that, with any luck, will finally get her published, impress the Dean, and save her job. But her English idyll ends when her mother, Hildy, shuffles off her mortal coil from an apparent heart attack.

Returning to Brigid's Island, NC, for the funeral, Summer is impatient to settle the estate, sell her mom's embarrassingly romance-themed bookstore, Beach Reads, and go home. But as she drops by Beach Reads, Summer finds threatening notes addressed to Hildy: "Sell the bookstore or die."

Clearly, something is rotten on Brigid's Island. What method is behind the madness? Was Hildy murdered? The police insist there's not enough evidence to launch a murder investigation. Instead, Summer and her Aunt Agatha screw their courage to the sticking place and start sleuthing, with the help of Hildy's beloved book club. But there are more suspects on Brigid's Island than are dreamt of in the Bard's darkest philosophizing. And if Summer can't find the villain, the town will be littered with a Shakespearean tragedy's worth of corpses--including her own.

My Thoughts on the Book
Little Bookshop of Murder was an okay first book in a new series. I liked that it had a diverse cast of interesting characters and the plot/storyline was okay, even if it had a few threads that didn't go anywhere, a couple of flaws in general and a couple of repetitions. I liked the bookshop though, as well as Mr. Darcy. It was also a light and easy read, so it's not like it's a terrible read.

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