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Review; A History of Hexing (Enchanted Academy, #2) by Evie Wilde

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Last year I recieved an ARC of the reverse harem fantasy novel A History of Hexing (Enchanted Academy, #2) by Evie Wilde through Netgalley. I read it shortly afterwards and today I'll post my review. Description from Goodreads When there’s four of them, and one of me, we can’t have any secrets... I need to focus on improving my magic. And having four delicious men can make things… complicated. Especially when Kyler is distracted by Sonny, a mysterious friend from his past. Through Sonny we’re all learning Kyler’s secrets, some of which I wish I didn’t know. But as a group, we have bigger fish to fry. Archmage Edius is making moves, and if we don’t study hard, he’s going to best us. Maybe he already has. At the Fall Festival, a mass poisoning screams of his evil handiwork. No matter how strong I’m becoming, I need my men to strive for more so we can defeat him, for good. The chemistry between us is electric, now I just need my magic to follow suit. Oliver, Braeden and D

Review; The Cruel Prince (The Folk of the Air #1) by Holly Black

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A while ago I read The Cruel Prince (The Folk of the Air #1) by Holly Black and today I'll post my review. Description from Goodreads Of course I want to be like them. They’re beautiful as blades forged in some divine fire. They will live forever. And Cardan is even more beautiful than the rest. I hate him more than all the others. I hate him so much that sometimes when I look at him, I can hardly breathe. Jude was seven when her parents were murdered and she and her two sisters were stolen away to live in the treacherous High Court of Faerie. Ten years later, Jude wants nothing more than to belong there, despite her mortality. But many of the fey despise humans. Especially Prince Cardan, the youngest and wickedest son of the High King. To win a place at the Court, she must defy him–and face the consequences. As Jude becomes more deeply embroiled in palace intrigues and deceptions, she discovers her own capacity for trickery and bloodshed. But as betrayal threatens to drown th

Let's Talk Bookish; How Has Blogging Affected Your Reading?

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It's Friday, which means it's time for a new Let's Talk Bookish post, courtesy of Eternity Books and Literary Lion . The theme of the week was how has blogging affected your reading? Blogging has certainly affected my reading, but I think that overall is has had a positive impact on my reading. Over the years, I've become more conscious in general on my reading picks, but I've also had the pleasure of discovering new authors and genres I wouldn't have done if not for blogging. Aside from a couple of Agatha Christie books, I've not read cosy mysteries before blogging and now I've read over a hundred. I've even picked up a few western novels (yeah, those historical cowboy books) and realized just why my late father loved them so much. Another aspect is that I've been reading a lot more diverse books due to blogging, whether it's BIPOC, LGBT+ or something else. As I'm bi myself, I know first-hand how important representation can be and tha

Review; The Winter of the Witch by Katherine Arden

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As I read The Girl in the Tower by Katherine Arden, I had to finish the trilogy by reading The Winter of the Witch. Today I'll post my review. Description from Goodreads One girl can make a difference... Moscow is in flames, leaving its people searching for answers – and someone to blame. Vasilisa, a girl with extraordinary gifts, must flee for her life, pursued by those who blame their misfortune on her magic. Then a vengeful demon returns, stronger than ever. Determined to engulf the world in chaos, he finds allies among men and spirits. Mankind and magical creatures alike find their fates resting on Vasya's shoulders. But she may not be able to save them all. My Thoughts on the Book It's such a well written book and I almost felt like I was walking beside Vasya at times. The Winter of the Witch is heartbreaking at times, it even made me cry a couple of times. And honestly, I disliked Konstantin, the priest, almost as much as a certain Umbridge from the Harry Po

Review; The Girl in the Tower by Katherine Arden

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As I was keen on finding out what happened next with Vasya after reading The Bear and the Nightingale by Katherine Arden, I ended up reading The Girl in the Tower. Today I'll post my review. Description from Goodreads For a young woman in medieval Russia, the choices are stark: marriage or a life in a convent. Vasya will choose a third way: magic... The court of the Grand Prince of Moscow is plagued by power struggles and rumours of unrest. Meanwhile bandits roam the countryside, burning the villages and kidnapping its daughters. Setting out to defeat the raiders, the Prince and his trusted companion come across a young man riding a magnificent horse. Only Sasha, a priest with a warrior's training, recognises this 'boy' as his younger sister, thought to be dead or a witch by her village. But when Vasya proves herself in battle, riding with remarkable skill and inexplicable power, Sasha realises he must keep her secret as she may be the only way to save the city fro

Top Ten Tuesday; Books That Made Me Laugh Out Loud

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It's Tuesday and time for a new Top Ten Tuesday post, courtesy of That Artsy Reader Girl . The theme of the week was books that made me laugh out loud. Here's my picks. The Hocus Pocus Magic Shop by Abigail Drake How Not to Die Alone by Richard Roper The Little Bookshop of Love Stories by Jaimie Admans The Readers of Broken Wheel Recommend by Katarina Bivald Endangered (Daughter of Hades - Book One) by Dani Hoots The Diary of a Bookseller by Shaun Bythell Confessions of a Bookseller by Shaun Bythell Seven Kind of People You Find in Bookshops by Shaun Bythell Aru Shah and the End of Time by Roshani Chokshi Aru Shah and the Song of Death by Roshani Chokshi

Review; Seraphina (Seraphina #1) by Rachel Hartman

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A while ago I read Seraphina by Rachael Hartman and today I'll post my review. Description from Goodreads In her New York Times bestselling and Morris Award-winning debut, Rachel Hartman introduces mathematical dragons in an alternative-medieval world to fantasy and science-fiction readers of all ages. Eragon-author Christopher Paolini calls them, "Some of the most interesting dragons I've read in fantasy." Four decades of peace have done little to ease the mistrust between humans and dragons in the kingdom of Goredd. Folding themselves into human shape, dragons attend court as ambassadors, and lend their rational, mathematical minds to universities as scholars and teachers. As the treaty's anniversary draws near, however, tensions are high. Seraphina Dombegh has reason to fear both sides. An unusually gifted musician, she joins the court just as a member of the royal family is murdered—in suspiciously draconian fashion. Seraphina is drawn into the investigat