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Review; The Magic Doll by Adrienne Yabouza and Élodie Nouhen

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Recently, I read the picture book The Magic Doll by Adrienne Yabouza and Élodie Nouhen and today I'll post my review. Description from Goodreads Families of all kinds will appreciate this simple tale of love and longing, motherhood and magic. In a small village in West Africa, a young girl explains the special way she was born. Her mother had difficulty getting pregnant, so she seeks help in the form of a doll which she treats like a human baby, carrying it on her back and covering it with kisses. Months go by and finally the woman's belly begins to grow! This beautiful story explores the Akua-Ba fertility figures of the Akan people of Ghana, while also depicting the deep love a mother has for her children. Élodie Nouhen's subtle, gorgeous illustrations combine collage and prints that are reminiscent of traditional African art, while remaining uniquely contemporary. Each spread communicates the look and feel of West Africa--the blazing yellow of the sun, the deep blue of t

Top Ten Tuesday; Books I Love That Were Written Over Ten Years Ago

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As it's Tuesday again, I think it's probably time for another Top Ten Tuesday, courtesy  That Artsy Reader Girl of and the theme of the week was books I love that were written over ten years ago. Here's my picks. Bannockburn 1314 by Lynette Nusbacher Description from Goodreads Recent scholarship has illuminated one of the most exciting battles of Scottish history, showing it to be as historically significant as it was romantic and bloody. This book carries the reader through the politics and plans of a military campaign of the Middle Ages. Using recent studies on weapons, warfare, and Scottish history, as well as sound archival sources, this book opens the files on a year's preparation for a massive English invasion of Scotland. In addition to the heroic legends, Bannockburn 1314 examines the common soldiers summoned to war and the knights who fought near them. A Pair of Silver Wings by James Holland Description from Goodreads At the school where Edward Enderby taught

Review; One of Us Is Lying by Karen M. McManus

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Recently, I ended up reading the YA novel One of Us Is Lying by Karen M. McManus and today I'll post my review of the book. Description from Goodreads One of Us Is Lying is the story of what happens when five strangers walk into detention and only four walk out alive. Everyone is a suspect, and everyone has something to hide. On Monday afternoon, five students at Bayview High walk into detention. Bronwyn, the brain, is Yale-bound and never breaks a rule. Addy, the beauty, is the picture-perfect homecoming princess. Nate, the criminal, is already on probation for dealing. Cooper, the athlete, is the all-star baseball pitcher. And Simon, the outcast, is the creator of Bayview High's notorious gossip app. Only, Simon never makes it out of that classroom. Before the end of detention, Simon's dead. And according to investigators, his death wasn't an accident. On Monday, he died. But on Tuesday, he'd planned to post juicy reveals about all four of his high-profile classm

Review; Popcorn and Poltergeists by Nancy Warren

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I recently read the paranormal cosy mystery Popcorn and Poltergeists by Nancy Warren and today I'll post my review. Description from Goodreads Is there a murderous poltergeist on the loose? When an Oxford professor is killed by a fall down the library stairs, rumors fly that it’s the work of a poltergeist who’s been causing havoc at the college. The dead prof was a knitter, and a customer at Lucy Swift’s shop, Cardinal Woolsey’s. But Lucy thinks a very human killer is shifting the blame onto a ghost who can’t defend themselves and she’s determined to trap the real killer and get justice for the dead knitter. However, danger lurks at the college where old secrets and new crimes collide. Vampire and old book expert Rafe Crosyer has been called in to value the college’s literary collection, and he witnesses first hand how angry the ghost really is. Furious enough to kill? Or is there something else the tantrum-throwing spirit is trying to tell them? And will they decipher the message

Review; Bobbles and Broomsticks by Nancy Warren

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I recently read the paranormal cosy mystery Bobbles and Broomsticks by Nancy Warren and today I'll post my review. Description from Goodreads Who invited Death to the wedding? When an ancient beam falls on one of the guests at Charlie and Alice’s wedding rehearsal, it looks like the work of the death watch beetle, an insect that eats old timbers. But fledgling witch Lucy and the vampire knitting club aren’t so sure. Could there be a murderer casting blame on the wood-chomping insects? Meanwhile, the old broom that’s always stood in the corner of Cardinal Woolsey’s knitting and yarn shop seems to have a mind of its own, and Lucy’s cat is ready to hop aboard and take the broom for a spin. With or without Lucy. Between learning a new knitting stitch and keeping her broom and cat earthbound, Lucy hasn’t got time to solve a murder—until it turns out the next victim is someone she loves. Join Lucy and her eccentric band of amateur sleuths in Oxford as they attempt to unravel a twisted sk

Let's Talk Bookish; Reviewing Books

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It's Friday and perhaps time for a new Let's Talk Bookish post, courtesy of  Book Nook Bits and the theme of the week was reviewing books. Here's the further prompts. What makes you want to review or not review a book? Do you review every book you read? Are some books harder to review than others? Do you review books you disliked? If you’ve ever written a ranty review, have you regretted doing so afterwards? Do you delete reviews that are “outdated” or don’t follow what you think of the book now? I've got the policy that I review all the books I read, apart from when I went to university, as I felt I couldn't review the course books. Regardless of that, some books are harder to review than others, whether they touch upon tough subjects, or are just so average that I can't pinpoint what's good or bad about them. I do indeed review books that I disliked, but I try my best to be diplomatic and constructive in my criticism of whatever book I disliked. Not all

Book Tag; The School Days Book Tag

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I came across The School Days Book Tag over at  What Victoria Read and decided to play along as it looked like a fun tag to do. THE QUESTIONS: The idea of this tag is that you do the 'Times Of Day' questions and then choose any of the 'Subject' questions that seem interesting to you! Pick and choose as many as you'd like and do them in any order - just have fun! Times Of Day: First bell: Tell us about the book that first got you into reading! I honestly can't quite remember the first book, but I did enjoy Roald Dahl books as a kid. Break time: Which book have you most recently had to take a break from or DNF? The Institute by Stephen King Lunch time: Tell us about your favourite book that features food! Chocolat by Joanne Harris. Final bell: Which book have you most recently finished reading? Killing Trail by Margaret Mizushima Homework: What was the last non-fiction book that you read and enjoyed? Last Stop Auschwitz by Eddy de Wind Staff room: Tell us about