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Showing posts from August, 2022

Review; The Magic Doll by Adrienne Yabouza and Élodie Nouhen

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Recently, I read the picture book The Magic Doll by Adrienne Yabouza and Élodie Nouhen and today I'll post my review. Description from Goodreads Families of all kinds will appreciate this simple tale of love and longing, motherhood and magic. In a small village in West Africa, a young girl explains the special way she was born. Her mother had difficulty getting pregnant, so she seeks help in the form of a doll which she treats like a human baby, carrying it on her back and covering it with kisses. Months go by and finally the woman's belly begins to grow! This beautiful story explores the Akua-Ba fertility figures of the Akan people of Ghana, while also depicting the deep love a mother has for her children. Élodie Nouhen's subtle, gorgeous illustrations combine collage and prints that are reminiscent of traditional African art, while remaining uniquely contemporary. Each spread communicates the look and feel of West Africa--the blazing yellow of the sun, the deep blue of t

Top Ten Tuesday; Books I Love That Were Written Over Ten Years Ago

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As it's Tuesday again, I think it's probably time for another Top Ten Tuesday, courtesy  That Artsy Reader Girl of and the theme of the week was books I love that were written over ten years ago. Here's my picks. Bannockburn 1314 by Lynette Nusbacher Description from Goodreads Recent scholarship has illuminated one of the most exciting battles of Scottish history, showing it to be as historically significant as it was romantic and bloody. This book carries the reader through the politics and plans of a military campaign of the Middle Ages. Using recent studies on weapons, warfare, and Scottish history, as well as sound archival sources, this book opens the files on a year's preparation for a massive English invasion of Scotland. In addition to the heroic legends, Bannockburn 1314 examines the common soldiers summoned to war and the knights who fought near them. A Pair of Silver Wings by James Holland Description from Goodreads At the school where Edward Enderby taught

Review; One of Us Is Lying by Karen M. McManus

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Recently, I ended up reading the YA novel One of Us Is Lying by Karen M. McManus and today I'll post my review of the book. Description from Goodreads One of Us Is Lying is the story of what happens when five strangers walk into detention and only four walk out alive. Everyone is a suspect, and everyone has something to hide. On Monday afternoon, five students at Bayview High walk into detention. Bronwyn, the brain, is Yale-bound and never breaks a rule. Addy, the beauty, is the picture-perfect homecoming princess. Nate, the criminal, is already on probation for dealing. Cooper, the athlete, is the all-star baseball pitcher. And Simon, the outcast, is the creator of Bayview High's notorious gossip app. Only, Simon never makes it out of that classroom. Before the end of detention, Simon's dead. And according to investigators, his death wasn't an accident. On Monday, he died. But on Tuesday, he'd planned to post juicy reveals about all four of his high-profile classm

Review; Popcorn and Poltergeists by Nancy Warren

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I recently read the paranormal cosy mystery Popcorn and Poltergeists by Nancy Warren and today I'll post my review. Description from Goodreads Is there a murderous poltergeist on the loose? When an Oxford professor is killed by a fall down the library stairs, rumors fly that it’s the work of a poltergeist who’s been causing havoc at the college. The dead prof was a knitter, and a customer at Lucy Swift’s shop, Cardinal Woolsey’s. But Lucy thinks a very human killer is shifting the blame onto a ghost who can’t defend themselves and she’s determined to trap the real killer and get justice for the dead knitter. However, danger lurks at the college where old secrets and new crimes collide. Vampire and old book expert Rafe Crosyer has been called in to value the college’s literary collection, and he witnesses first hand how angry the ghost really is. Furious enough to kill? Or is there something else the tantrum-throwing spirit is trying to tell them? And will they decipher the message

Review; Bobbles and Broomsticks by Nancy Warren

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I recently read the paranormal cosy mystery Bobbles and Broomsticks by Nancy Warren and today I'll post my review. Description from Goodreads Who invited Death to the wedding? When an ancient beam falls on one of the guests at Charlie and Alice’s wedding rehearsal, it looks like the work of the death watch beetle, an insect that eats old timbers. But fledgling witch Lucy and the vampire knitting club aren’t so sure. Could there be a murderer casting blame on the wood-chomping insects? Meanwhile, the old broom that’s always stood in the corner of Cardinal Woolsey’s knitting and yarn shop seems to have a mind of its own, and Lucy’s cat is ready to hop aboard and take the broom for a spin. With or without Lucy. Between learning a new knitting stitch and keeping her broom and cat earthbound, Lucy hasn’t got time to solve a murder—until it turns out the next victim is someone she loves. Join Lucy and her eccentric band of amateur sleuths in Oxford as they attempt to unravel a twisted sk

Let's Talk Bookish; Reviewing Books

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It's Friday and perhaps time for a new Let's Talk Bookish post, courtesy of  Book Nook Bits and the theme of the week was reviewing books. Here's the further prompts. What makes you want to review or not review a book? Do you review every book you read? Are some books harder to review than others? Do you review books you disliked? If you’ve ever written a ranty review, have you regretted doing so afterwards? Do you delete reviews that are “outdated” or don’t follow what you think of the book now? I've got the policy that I review all the books I read, apart from when I went to university, as I felt I couldn't review the course books. Regardless of that, some books are harder to review than others, whether they touch upon tough subjects, or are just so average that I can't pinpoint what's good or bad about them. I do indeed review books that I disliked, but I try my best to be diplomatic and constructive in my criticism of whatever book I disliked. Not all

Book Tag; The School Days Book Tag

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I came across The School Days Book Tag over at  What Victoria Read and decided to play along as it looked like a fun tag to do. THE QUESTIONS: The idea of this tag is that you do the 'Times Of Day' questions and then choose any of the 'Subject' questions that seem interesting to you! Pick and choose as many as you'd like and do them in any order - just have fun! Times Of Day: First bell: Tell us about the book that first got you into reading! I honestly can't quite remember the first book, but I did enjoy Roald Dahl books as a kid. Break time: Which book have you most recently had to take a break from or DNF? The Institute by Stephen King Lunch time: Tell us about your favourite book that features food! Chocolat by Joanne Harris. Final bell: Which book have you most recently finished reading? Killing Trail by Margaret Mizushima Homework: What was the last non-fiction book that you read and enjoyed? Last Stop Auschwitz by Eddy de Wind Staff room: Tell us about

Top Five Wednesday; Bookish Happiness

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It's Wednesday and perhaps time for another Top Five Wednesday post, courtesy of  the Top Five Wednesday Goodreads group and the theme of the week was bookish happiness. Here's my five picks. Fifteen Seconds of Normal by Alex Marestaing The Little Bookshop of Love Stories by Jaimie Admans The Particular Charm of Miss Jane Austen by Ada Bright & Cass Grafton Chocolat by Joanne Harris The Saffron Trail by Rosanna Ley

Review; The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao by Junot Díaz

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A while back I ended up reading The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao by Junot Díaz. As the author is from the Dominican Republic, I can finally cross of that book on my list for the World Literature Project. Today I'll post my review. Description from Goodreads Things have never been easy for Oscar, a sweet but disastrously overweight, lovesick Dominican ghetto nerd. From his home in New Jersey, where he lives with his old-world mother and rebellious sister, Oscar dreams of becoming the Dominican J. R. R. Tolkien and, most of all, of finding love. But he may never get what he wants, thanks to the Fukœ—the curse that has haunted the Oscar's family for generations, dooming them to prison, torture, tragic accidents, and, above all, ill-starred love. Oscar, still waiting for his first kiss, is just its most recent victim. Diaz immerses us in the tumultuous life of Oscar and the history of the family at large, rendering with genuine warmth and dazzling energy, humor, and insi

Review; The Story So Far by Jane Eklund

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For Dewey's 24 Hour Readathon in April, I read The Story So Far by Jane Eklund and today I'll post my review. Desription from Goodreads It's 1977. A 22-year-old finds herself ensconced in a place of dust and history: the archives room of a second-rate college. She's re-shelving Victorian etiquette books when the door opens and in walks a fabulous, seductive, larger-than-life writer of historical romances--and the young woman's life will never be the same. Set against 25 years of cultural evolution, the love between the two women--the younger librarian and the grande dame of cheesy literature--outlasts a 28-year age difference, romantic dalliances, illness, and the confines of the closet. Along the way, the librarian ponders the nature of life, death, religion, and philosophy with the help of the imaginary counterparts of Socrates, Hildegard of Bingen, and Suzanne Pleshette; samples casseroles with names like Vegetables Psychosis and The Tubers Karamazov; and forges

Announcing the Autumn Reading Challenge 2022

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As I've hosted an autumn-inspired reading challenge for a few years now, I wanted to host one this year too. The challenge will be informal and laidback, running from September 1st to November 30th. There will be no pressure from me in doing ALL the categories, but you're totally allowed to do them all if you want. You can even combine them, if a book fits into more than one category if you want or read several books for one or more categories. Also, feel free to do some interpretation(s) on the prompt(s), as they are fairly open. "Reporting back" what you've read is not mandatory, only encouraged. Feel free to comment below what you've read, or if you're on Instagram or Twitter, feel free to use the hashtag #trykksverteautumnchallenge2022 . Reading should be fun and not feel forced, so I wanted to keep things as simple and easy as possible, even if it's a challenge. Anyway, here's the categories for this year. A spooky novel A book with an autumn-

Review; The Summer of Jordi Perez (And the Best Burger in LA) by Amy Spalding

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I recently read the contemporary YA novel The Summer of Jordi Perez (And the Best Burger in LA) by Amy Spalding and today I'll post my review. Description from Goodreads Seventeen, fashion-obsessed, and gay, Abby Ives has always been content playing the sidekick in other people's lives. While her friends and sister have plunged headfirst into the world of dating and romances, Abby has stayed focused on her plus-size style blog and her dreams of taking the fashion industry by storm. When she lands a prized internship at her favorite local boutique, she’s thrilled to take her first step into her dream career. She doesn't expect to fall for her fellow intern, Jordi Pérez. Abby knows it's a big no-no to fall for a colleague. She also knows that Jordi documents her whole life in photographs, while Abby would prefer to stay behind the scenes. Then again, nothing is going as expected this summer. She's competing against the girl she's kissing to win a paid job at the

Let's Talk Bookish; All About E-Books

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It's Friday and perhaps time for a new Let's Talk Bookish post courtesy of  Book Nook Bits and the theme of the week was all about e-books. Here's the further prompts. Are ebooks the future of books? What are the advantages and disadvantages of ebooks? Are ebooks strictly better than physical books? Do all avid readers prefer real, paper books? Do you use an e-reader, or read on a phone/tablet? Do you ever find yourself missing one or the other? I'm of the opinion that even though e-books has a few perks, I don't think physical books will die out anytime soon, so I believe they will co-exist in one way or another. Some of the perks of e-books are of course they take up little space and a heck of a lot easier to carry with you than the physical ones, but personally I do prefer physical books over e-books as there's something about the feeling of having the actual book in your hand instead of on a tablet of sorts. Some of us avid readers prefer physical books, w

Book Tag; Secret Life of a Book Blogger Tag

I came across the Secret Life of a Book Blogger Tag over at  Meeghan Reads and decided to play along as it looked like an interesting tag. How long have you been blogging? For roughly 10 years now. At what point do you think you’ll stop blogging? I have no idea, even if I've played with the thought of taking a break. What is the best thing about blogging? Giving people inspiration to pick up books. What is the worst thing? What do you do to make it okay? All the work that needs to be done, as it can be a bit time consuming at times. How long does it take you to make/find pictures to use? Less than half an hour. Who is your book crush? None at the moment. What author would you like to have on your blog? She's more of an historian than an author, although she has published one book, but it would be fun having Lynette Nusbacher on the blog. What do you wear when you write your blog posts? Casual clothes. How long does it take you to prepare? It depends on the blog post I'll

Top Five Wednesday; Strong Females

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It's Wednesday and perhaps time for a new Top Five Wednesday post, courtesy of  the Top Five Wednesday Goodreads group and the theme of the week was strong females. Here's my favourite picks. Basically all women in Swords, Sorcery, and Self-Rescuing Damsels edited by Lee French & Sarah Craft Basically all the women in Maiden, Mother, Crone - Fantastical Trans Femmes edited by Gwen Benaway Sophia and Constance from Cinderella is Dead by Kalynn Bayron Sidra from The Conjurer by Luanne G. Smith Arabella Holmes from Boneseeker by Brynn Chapman

Top Ten Tuesday; Books Set In a Place I’d Love to Visit

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It's Tuesday and time for yet another Top Ten Tuesday post, courtesy of  That Artsy Reader Girl and the theme of the week is books set in a place I'd love to visit. Here's my picks. A Witch Hunt in Whitby by Helen Cox The Vampire Knitting Club by Nancy Warren The Particular Charm of Miss Jane Austen by Ada Bright & Cass Grafton The Little Breton Bistro by Nina George The Little Paris Bookshop by Nina George The Saffron Trail by Rosanna Ley Murder on the Orient Express by Agatha Christie Cooking for Ghosts by Patricia V. Davis The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society by Mary Ann Shaffer and Anne Barrows The Winter People by Jennifer McMahon

Mailbox Monday; August 1st 2022

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It's the August 1st and what better way to start the month, than with a new Mailbox Monday post, courtesy of the  Mailbox Monday blog? For some of us book dragons, book mail is the best mail after all. Anyway, here's some of the books I've recieved in the mail lately. 'Salem's Lot by Stephen King Unbound: My Story of Liberation and the Birth of the Me Too Movement by Tarana Burke The Exorcist's House by Nick Roberts In the Ravenous Dark by A. M. Strickland Kingdom of the Wicked by Kerri Maniscalco My Best Friend's Exorcism by Grady Hendrix A Discovery of Witches by Deborah Harkness