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Review; Charcoal Boys by Roger Mello

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Several months ago I was fortunate enough to receieve an ARC of the picture book Charcoal Boys by Roger Mello through Netgalley. I read it shortly afterwards and today I'll post my review.

Description from Goodreads
From Hans Christian Andersen Award and Batchelder Honor Medal-winning author Roger Mello, a poetic and sensitive portrait of child labor in Brazil's charcoal mines.

Beautifully illustrated by Roger Mello with sophisticated, highly textural paper cut outs, Charcoal Boys follows a young boy working in Brazil's charcoal mines. The boy's strength and resilience shine through the darkness in this moving condemnation of child labor.

My Thoughts on the Book Charcoal Boys is a sad tale with some beautiful illustrations. I think this book could work great as a starting point in regards of the topic of child labour.

Review; The Backyard Fire Cookbook: Cooking with Live Fire, Coals, and More by Linda Ly

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Earlier this year I was fortunate enough to recieve an ARC of The Backyard Fire Cookbook: Cooking with Live Fire, Coals, and More by Linda Ly through Netgalley. I read it shortly afterwards, but I haven't published my review until now.

Description from Goodreads
Ditch the boring gas grill and light your fire with this comprehensive guide from the author of The New Camp Cookbook. The Backyard Fire Cookbook offers techniques and recipes to master cooking with live fire and coals, including smoking, planking, cast iron, foil packs, and more.

You might have distinct memories of your parents lighting the coals in your backyard, or of some of your favorite meals being cooked by campfire. Whatever your experience, it's undeniable that when cooking starts with a live fire, the results are worth remembering.

In The Backyard Fire Cookbook, author Linda Ly will teach you how to master the flames, as well as a variety of other techniques—all possible in your own backyard. For the adventu…

Review; Little Free Libraries and Tiny Sheds: 12 Miniature Structures You Can Build to Enhance Your Yard or Neighborhood by Philip Schmidt

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Last year I was fortunate enough to recieve an ARC of the book Little Free Libraries and Tiny Sheds: 12 Miniature Structures You Can Build to Enhance Your Yard or Neighborhood by Philip Schmidt through Netgalley. I've now read the book and today I'll post my review.

Description from Goodreads Expand the sharing movement to your community with Little Free Libraries and Tiny Sheds —your complete source for building tiny sharing structures, including plans for 12 different structures, step-by-step photography and instructions, inspirational examples, and maintenance.

Around the world, a community movement is underway featuring quaint landscape structures mounted on posts in front yards and other green spaces. Some are built for personal use, as miniature sheds for gardeners or as decorative accent pieces. More commonly, though, they are evidence of the growing trend toward neighborhood organization and community outreach.

This movement has been popularized by Wisconsin-based Lit…

Book Blitz; Don't Blame the Reckless by Maddyson Wilson

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Book Tag Saturday; Pride Flag Book Tag

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I came across the Pride Flag Book Tag over at The Book Dutchesses (originally created by Common Spence) and I decided to play along.
1. Red (Life) – A book with a spirited protagonist totally proud of who they are. Someone who gives you LIFE! Amal from Does My Head Look Big in This? by Randa Abdel-Fattah is a bit kick-ass when she decides to wear the hijab full time instead of part time and defends herself and her decision.
2. Orange (Healing) – A book that made you, as the reader, find a deeper meaning or catharsis in your own life. One book worth mentioning would be This Is About You: Amazing, Weird, Beautiful You by Mary England.
3. Yellow (Sunshine) – A book that fills you with so much joy it could brighten even your darkest day. A book that certainly gives me joy is Chocolat by Joanne Harris.
4. Green (Nature) – A book that is set out of this world — a reality different to our own. The Lunar Chronicles by Marissa Meyer.
5. Blue (Peace) – A book where one of the characters finds peace…

Book Blogger Hop; What Do You Like/Dislike About Self-Published Books?

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It's Friday and time for yet another Book Blogger Hop post, courtesy of Ramblings of a Coffee Addicted Writer. The question of the week was "What do you like/dislike about self-published books?".
Book Blogger Hop One of the things I enjoy about self-published books are the variety of stories and in general hidden gems. What I do dislike, is that sometimes books can seem more like (rough) first drafts, having some plot holes, poor grammar/spelling and so on and in general perhaps needing an editor to look through the book. Althrough I like self-published books, please do the proper work beforehand so you don't look stupid afterwards.

Review; Beau and Bett by Kathryn Berla

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A while ago I recieved an ARC of the YA novel Beau and Bett by Kathryn Berla through Netgalley. I read it shortly afterwards and today I'll post my review.

Description from Goodreads
After Beau LeFrancois's mother wrecks Bett Diaz’s luxury SUV, his family faces an impossibly large bill—with no car insurance to help pay it. To pay off the debt, Beau spends his weekends working at the Diaz Ranch.

Beau’s prepared to work, but he’s definitely not prepared for the infamous temper of Bett Diaz, also known as "The Beast" at school. As Beau learns the secrets behind Bett’s tough exterior, he finds himself falling for her . . . until he catches Bett in a lie.

A contemporary twist on a classic fairy tale, Beau and Bett is a timely story of family, friendship, and the power of speaking out and standing up for yourself.

My Thoughts on the Book This was a fun read and I loved the gender reversal on the Beauty and the Beast. I loved Beau as a character and his family, but I felt th…

Wednesday Weekly Blogging Challenge; 8 Favourite Authors of Poetry

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It's Wednesday again, which means it's time for a new Wednesday Weekly Blogging Challenge courtesy of Long and Short Reviews. The theme of the week was favourite authors of X genre, so I chose poetry.
My picks are; Najwa Zebian Edgar Allan Poe  Sylvia Plath Pablo Neruda Lang Leav Rupi Kaur Michael Faudet William Shakespeare

Top Ten Tuesday; Books with LGBTQIA Characters

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It's Tuesday again, which means it's time for a new Top Ten Tuesday post courtesy of Artsy Reader Girl. As the theme was a character freebie, I decided to write a top ten list of books with LGBTQIA characters.
My picks are;
Under the Udala Trees by Chinelo Okparanta
The Almond by Nedjma
If You Could Be Mine by Sara Farizan
Tipping the Velvet by Sarah Waters
Wooing the Farmer by Jenny Frame
Fried Green Tomatoes at the Whistle Stop Cafe by Fannie Flagg
My Crunchy Life by Mia Kerick
Where Song Replaces Silence by Layla Dorine
Gender Queer: A Memoir by Maia Kobabe
Blue is the Warmest Color by Julie Maroh

Review; The Overdue Life of Amy Byler by Kelly Harms

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(This post contains an affiliate link.)

A few months ago I was fortunate enough to recieve an ARC of the novel The Overdue Life of Amy Byler by Kelly Harms through Netgalley. I read it shortly afterwards and today I'll post my review.

Description from Goodreads
Overworked and underappreciated, single mom Amy Byler needs a break. So when the guilt-ridden husband who abandoned her shows up and offers to take care of their kids for the summer, she accepts his offer and escapes rural Pennsylvania for New York City.

Usually grounded and mild mannered, Amy finally lets her hair down in the city that never sleeps. She discovers a life filled with culture, sophistication, and—with a little encouragement from her friends—a few blind dates. When one man in particular makes quick work of Amy’s heart, she risks losing herself completely in the unexpected escape, and as the summer comes to an end, Amy realizes too late that she must make an impossible decision: stay in this exciting new chapte…

Review; Fish: Recipes and Techniques for Freshwater Fish by Jon Wipfli

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Last year I was fortunate enough to recieve an ARC of the cookbook Fish: Recipes and Techniques for Freshwater Fish by Jon Wipfli through Netgalley. I read it shortly afterwards, but I haven't published the review until now.

Description from Goodreads
From water to table, Fish—author and chef Jonathan Wipfli’s follow-up to Venison—shows you how to responsibly harvest and clean freshwater game fish throughout the seasons, and how to cook them perfectly. Be the star fisher and chef at every dinner and cookout!

Written by the author and chef behind Venison and a Minneapolis-based catering services company specializing in wild game, Fish takes readers through Jonathan Wipfli's techniques for efficiently processing and cleaning game fish, as well as a raft of 50 contemporary recipes for dishes and accompanying sides. Addressing the most popular freshwater game fish pursued by North American outdoors enthusiasts—including walleye, pike, catfish, trout, salmon, bass, panfish, and mor…

Book Tag Saturday; Halloween in July Book Tag

I found this tag at Howling Libraries, but the original creator of the tag is The Book Gypsy on Instagram.

1. What book gave you the creeps?
The Winter People by Jennifer McMahon

2. What book gives you the best Halloween vibes?
The Exorcist by William Peter Blatty

3. What’s your favorite vampire book?
Dracula by Bram Stoker, but those who know me well enough probably isn't surprised by the answer as I wrote my BA dissertation on that book,.

4. What book scared you so much you had to sleep with the light on?
Believe it or not, so far I haven't read a book that scared me so much I had to sleep with the lights on. Maybe it is because I'm so used watching/reading horror, that I'm not that easily spooked.

5. What’s your favorite book about witches/goblins/ghosts/demons?
Witches; The Hocus Pocus Magic Shop by Abigail Drake
Ghosts; The Woman in Black by Susan Hill
So far, I haven't read any books with demons or goblins, so I can't pick any favourites for those.

6. What book…

Book Blogger Hop; Do You Review All the Books You Read?

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It's Friday and time for a new Book Blogger Hop post, courtesy of Ramblings of a Coffee Addicted Writer. The question of the week was "Do you review all the books you read?".
Book Blogger Hop In my case, I review all the books I read. It means I might give a less than totally raving book review, but I can't enjoy ALL the books I read.

Review; Lord of the Butterflies by Andrea Gibson

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A few months back I was fortunate enough to recieve an ARC of the poetry collection Lord of the Butterflies by Andrea Gibson through Netgalley. I read it shortly afterwards and today I'll post my review.

Description from Goodreads
In Andrea Gibson's latest collection, they continue their artful and nuanced looks at gender, romance, loss, and family. Each emotion here is deft and delicate, resting inside of imagery heavy enough to sink the heart, while giving the body wings to soar.

My Thoughts on the Book
I loved this collection for the raw, honest and powerful poems. There were of course some poems that touched me more than others, some of them were Orlando and Dear Trump Voter.

TBR Mix 'n' Mingle; What I'm Reading in July 2019

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It's the first Wednesday of the month again, which means it's time for a new TBR Mix 'n' Mingle post courtesy of The Hungry Bookworm.

Here's a few of the books I'm planning to read this month.

Austentatious: The Evolving World of Jane Austen Fas by Holly Luetkenhaus and Zoe Weinstein

Thief of Cahraman by Lucy Tempest

Magic Diary by Pat LaMarche

The Seventh Life of Aline Lloyd by Robert Davies

Circle of Blood by Thomas M. Malafarina

Broken Wings by Jia Pingwa

The Body in the Mist by Nick Louth

Murder at Royale Court by G. P. Gardner

A Patchwork of Clues by Sally Goldenbaum

Summer Dreams at Villa Limoncello by Daisy James

The Woman on the Cliff by Janice Frost

The Cask by Freeman Wills Croft

Release Day Blitz; Hell at Halfingdon Asylum by Alice J. Black

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Publisher: The Parliament House (@theparliamentpress) Book Title: Hell at Halfingdon Asylum
Series: Soul Seekers Book #9
Author: Alice J. Black
Add to Goodreads Link: https://bit.ly/31XbeL1

Synopsis
Peyton is asked to work on her hardest case for Soul Seekers yet as she’s called to Halfingdon Asylum to clear it of spirit energy before it’s converted into an office building. She has her reservations from the start but keeps them from Jake, her partner, as the investigation is underway.

However, the asylum isn’t going to give up easily, and Peyton will not only need to save herself from the darkness that seems hell bent on keeping her locked inside but figure a way out of the building before it’s too late…

Top Ten Tuesday; Childhood Favourites

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It's Tuesday, which means it's time for yet another Top Ten Tuesday post, courtesy of That Artsy Reader Girl. The theme of the week was childhood favourites, which made me go down memory lane a little bit. I could probably have written a top ten list of Roald Dahl books only, but I decided to throw some other books into the mix as well, considering all the books I encountered as a kid.
My picks are;
The Tale of Peter Rabbit by Beatrix Potter
When the Robbers Came to Cardamom Town by Thorbjørn Egner
The Chronicles of Narnia by C. S. Lewis
The Wind in the Willows by Kenneth Grahame
Ronja, The Robber's Daughter by Astrid Lindgren
The Brothers Lionheart by Astrid Lindgren
Charlie and the Chocolate Factory by Roald Dahl
Mathilda by Roald Dahl
Fantastic Mr. Fox by Roald Dahl
Dany the Champion of the World by Roald Dahl

Book Blitz & Giveaway; The Sisterhood Series by Chelsi Arnold

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Brave The Sisterhood Series Book 1 by Chelsi Arnold Genre: New Adult 
Four women dared to defy the rules...

Twenty-two-year-old Greer Connally believes life is about choices and consequences. When she is drafted with the first group of women in U.S. history, she is constantly challenged by those that neither want nor respect the women draftees.
Greer quickly learns teamwork is the only way to endure the mental and physical abuse of training. She and her teammates must find a way to overcome their differences and learn how to work with one another in order to survive BUD/S.
With the country divided, tensions mount as protests and terrorist attacks break-out across the world. Willing to sacrifice anything for their country, Greer and her teammates embark on a top-secret mission. But when the mission becomes compromised, Greer’s loyalties are quickly tested.
Forced to choose between the lives of her teammates or defying a direct order, Greer must decide which consequence she is willing to li…